Archive

Archive Of The Category "Reliability Culture"
My Favorite Reliability Phrases

My Favorite Reliability Phrases

Adam / September 20, 2017

I like the occasional good catchphrase.  I typically tend to speak in analogies and anecdotes and many of my customers and colleagues have suggested documenting them.  So on occasion, I will write them in my notebook.  Here are a few.

  1. Language is the tragedy of Reliability
  2. The “5 Why” root cause analysis works so well because it is intuitive.  Ever have a 4-year-old ask you about how something works?
  3. Bad data is like driving with a dirty windshield
  4. A completely clean data set is a fake data set
  5. Statistics is a language.  Take the time to learn the vocabulary
  6. Stress margin… Read More
The History of Reliability

The History of Reliability

Adam / August 22, 2017

 

If you had to section the history of reliability into only two periods I believe the dividing point would be around 1950.  The first section, stone age to 1950, the “Robust” era; 1950 to today,  the “Margin” era.   In the Robust era, reliability concerns were addressed by creating a design that was orders of magnitude stronger than required, “over-engineered”.  This protected against the variability of fabrication, use, and environment.  If it was made sloppily with low tolerances, it still worked;  Used for an unintended purpose, still worked; Left out in the snow, dropped in the river, run over…

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Mission profile

Mission profile

Adam / August 15, 2017

Mission profiles are fundamental to any reliability prediction being valid.  Without clearly defined environmental and use profiles there will be a long chain of inaccuracy that accumulates into significant errors within a product. 

This is what occurs at the following stages, or tools, if the mission profile or environment profile changes after its completion.

  • DFMEA: Failure modes may be excluded.  Critical failure modes may be ranked low for occurrence and not be addressed
  • DOE:  Stresses may not be included in the matrix.  Resulting singular and interaction failure modes will not be discovered in advance.
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The Reliability Engineer Role

The Reliability Engineer Role

Adam / August 08, 2017

What does the reliability engineer do?

Do they design reliable products?    Or       Do they guide the development of reliable products?

It’s some mix of course. It depends on the process for the organization they operate in. I will point out that neither extreme works. I am often surprised with how many organizations I see that still have the 1950’s model of ” Design it and then give it to the reliability team to make it reliable.” I still don’t believe there is a single person in any engineering role in any engineering organization that believes that works….

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Webinar ‘Reliability in the Product Development Process”

Webinar ‘Reliability in the Product Development Process”

Adam / July 28, 2017

“Reliability in the ProductDevelopmentn Process” July 26th

Special thanks to The Accendo Reliability community for hosting the webinar.

Overview:

One of the more significant challenges for reliability engineering in product development is complete execution of the planned reliability process in product development. The reliability tools and techniques outlined in the product plan are often skipped or delayed, minimizing the opportunity for outputs to impact the program and product fully.

This contrast of planning and execution does not occur equally with product plan goals such as time to market, developed technical features, and product cost point.  Each of those are closely measured in development and…

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It’s Not Really That Clean Cut

It’s Not Really That Clean Cut

Adam / July 27, 2017

This is the bathtub curve we are often shown.

This is what a real bathtub curve looks like.

A real bathtub curve would capture all the different types of failure modes, represented by each of these lines.  We typically talk about a failure mode being placed in one of the three categories, Quality (infant Mortality), Use stress, or Wear-out.  But in fact any specific type of failure mode may have driving factors in multiple categories.  The same failure mode may have a sensitivity…

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Software Design For Reliability

Software Design For Reliability

Adam / July 19, 2017

With all the complaints you hear about products rebooting and software crashing, do companies really practice Software Reliability? In fact, there are some companies that do, but they are mostly in the industries that require products to have high availability, such as telecom, defense, and space, or safety-averse industries, such as medical and industrial plant operation. Most other industries don’t pay as much attention to it. The best method to increase Software Reliability without significant increases to schedules or budgets is to use a Software Design for Reliability (SDFR) approach.  These are the key steps. Read More